Numbers!

numbersEnglishNumber.com is a very good little website to help you learn and practice… English numbers!

Small numbers, large numbers, and numbers of all kinds – such as the name of years (2018), months, dates, fractions, math equations, decimals, and percentages.

There are listening exercises where you can see if you understand the numbers correctly.

This works best on your computer, but it mostly works on your phone/tablet.

SayLish for Pronunciation Practice

  SayLish is a quite-new website to help you listen to English words and phrases – as part of presentations and conversations posted on YouTube.  PLUS – you can record your own voice, to compare your pronunciation with the video.

Voice recording support has been added just recently on iPhone/iPad with Safari, and we’ll give an example with that.  It also works with Android phones/tablets, and desktop computers.

For example, if you search for videos with the word “infrequently“, you will see part of a YouTube video that contains your chosen word.  After you listen to this, you can pause and …

  •   Repeat this to hear it again 
  •   Go to the next video that contains this word
  • or press the “Speaking” button to switch to the screen where you can record your voice
  •   After you listen, press the microphone to record, and try to pronounce the words you hear.  Then press Stop () when you finish

Then you can …

  •   Compare your pronunciation with the speaker in the video
  •   Go to the next part of the SAME video
  •   Go to the next video that contains your search word

Saylish has additional features which we will cover in another posting.

Tongue Twisters

  A tongue twister is a set of words that are difficult to pronounce together – especially when you try to say them quickly.  They are fun to try to speak, and can help improve your pronunciation.

For example, try saying this (slowly at first, and then faster):
Rubber baby buggy bumper

Or this one – to practice the TH sound:

(From englishclass101.com)  Or another one:
Theopolis the thistle sifter thrust a thistle through his thumb.

Here is a collection of many more tongue twisters – easy, medium, and difficult.

I’LL See You Tomorrow

Don’t say: 
– I see you tomorrow.
– I go with you now.
– I do my homework next weekend.
– I tell you when she comes home.
– I call you Monday.

Say this:
– I’ll see you tomorrow.    (I will see you tomorrow)
– I’ll go with you now.
– I’ll do my homework next weekend.
– I’ll tell you when she comes home.
– I’ll call you Monday.

Remember:

  • Use I’ll as the shortened form of I will when talking about something you will do.
  • I’ll = I + will 
  • Be sure to pronounce the whole word, not just the I
  • Listen to a lot more people pronounce I’ll on YouGlish